Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

The IQUA committee are pleased to confirm that ‘Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: A Quaternary Science Retrospective’ will take place in the Hunt Museum on Saturday 21 April.  This one day symposium will consist of a series of retrospective talks in celebration of key Quaternary scientists known for their trailblazing work investigating how the Irish landscape was shaped during and since the Ice Age.  Please find poster below.

Alongside the day of talks, the Granary Library will feature a free family-friendly exhibition of extinct and contemporary Irish mammals on Friday 20 and Saturday 21 April from 11am – 5pm. Please find poster below.

Please feel free to bring these events to the attention of anyone you feel may find them of interest.

Logistics:

  1. The closest parking to the Hunt Museum and Granary Library can be found at the following link: https://www.parkopedia.ie/parking/carpark/potato_market/v94/limerick/?arriving=201804091130&leaving=201804091330
  2. A list of local accommodation is also below.

 

Spring Meeting 2018 Core Programme

IQUA are planning on a range of new initiatives this year, the first of many in the lead up to INQUA 2019 (www.inqua2019.org/).

Spring Meeting

The core of programme for IQUA Spring Meeting in the Hunt Museum, Limerick on April 21st is with a selection of talks celebrating key Quaternary Scientists:

  • The challenges face by Women Quaternary Scientists Bettie Higgs (University College Cork)
  • Robert Lloyd Praeger (1865-1953) Timothy Collins (NUI, Galway)
  • Sydney Mary Thompson (1847-1923) Antoinette Madden & Catherine Dalton (Natural History Museum & Mary Immaculate College)
  • Bill Watts (1930- 2010) Keith Bennett (St Andrews University)
  • Valerie Hall (1946-2016) Gill Plunkett (Queens University Belfast)
  • Frank Mitchell (1912-1997) Fraser Mitchell (Trinity College Dublin)

Our spring meeting is generally focussed on postgraduate research – so we would also like to invite postgraduates who would like to make a presentation (oral or poster) to let me know (catherine.dalton@mic.ul.ie).

Exhibition and Booklet

IQUA has applied for funding to translate these talks into a pull-up banner exhibition and a booklet to be published by IQUA.

We are seeking further expressions of interest from IQUA members for a range of other written contributions.  Quaternary scientists included in the booklet paper should have carried out Quaternary-related research in (or relevant to) Ireland, but do not necessarily need to be from Ireland.

Names that have been suggested in conversation with members include:

  • Francis Synge
  • Jean (Jeanne) Margaret White
  • Hilda Parkes
  • Susan Geraty
  • Anthony Farrington
  • Nick Stephens
  • Anthony Orme
  • William King
  • Wood Martin
  • JB Whittow
  • Mary Sommerville (nee Fairfax)
  • Barbara Miller
  • Sybil Watson
  • Mary Patricia Happer Kertland

We propose include papers between 500-1000 words in length to maximise the range of individuals included in this booklet.  Author guidelines will be forwarded to contributing authors.

Can I encourage IQUA academic members to encourage your postgraduates to suggest and prepare contributions on key individuals.

Please send your suggestions to catherine.dalton@mic.ul.ie or eocarro@tcd.ie or mcglyng@tcd.ie  by April 1st 2018.

Deadline for submissions of papers will be June 30th  2018.

IQUA convened session at CIG 2018

This year IQUA has convened a session at the upcoming Conference of Irish Geographers (CIG) taking place in Maynooth university from the 10th to the 12th of May 2018 (http://www.conferenceofirishgeographers.ie/). Below are the details of the session and information about abstracts submissions (deadline: 30th of March 2018).

The Irish Quaternary: Exploring Landscape Change Over The Last 2.6 Million Years
Martha Coleman, Maynooth University; Alwynne McGeever, Trinity College Dublin

To tie in with the recent release of Advances in Irish Quaternary Studies and the approaching INQUA2019 conference to be held in Dublin this session will consider how the Irish landscape changed during the most recent period of Earth’s history; the Quaternary. The Quaternary refers to the last 2.6 million years. Quaternary studies are multi-disciplinary in nature and provide a critical long-term perspective that offers fascinating insights about the early Irish landscapes and culture. Research in this area includes the study of on and offshore glaciation and deglaciation in Ireland, reconstructing landscape development, quantifying past climate change and extreme weather events, uncovering the arrival and development of human civilisation and visualising the expansions and declines of Irish flora and fauna populations over time. This session will highlight the vast range of ongoing Irish research that provides unique insights into climate and landscape change over the last 2.6 million years, providing critical information on past and present Earth processes from a uniquely Irish perspective.

Although this session is convened by the Irish Quaternary Association (IQUA) we welcome relevant research/researchers from outside Ireland also. The wide scope of this session of study accommodates a diverse range of topics and invites papers from:

  • Archaeology
  • Climatology
  • Ecology
  • Engineering
  • Geomorphology
  • Geology
  • Hydrology

To be part of this session, please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to martha.coleman@mu.ie and amcgeeve@tcd.ie by 16 March 2018.

IQUA Spring Meeting 2018 – ‘Standing on the Shoulders of Giants’

As indicated before Xmas we plan on having the IQUA Spring Meeting in the Hunt Museum, Limerick on April 21st

Our spring meeting is generally focussed on postgraduate research – so we would like to invite members who would like to make a presentation (oral or poster) to let me know.  We are also planning on a few new initiatives this year, the first of many in the lead up to INQUA 2019 (www.inqua2019.org/).

To this end we plan on adding a selection of talks celebrating key Quaternary Scientists to the Spring Meeting programme (including Frank Mitchell, Sydney Mary Thompson, Bill Watts, Valerie Hall and Robert Lloyd Praeger).  These talks will subsequently form the core of a booklet to be published by IQUA.

We would like to invite IQUA members to contribute short papers on OTHER Quaternary Scientists to this booklet.

Please send your suggestions to catherine.dalton@mic.ul.ie or eocarro@tcd.ie by April 1st 2018.

Deadline for submissions of papers will be June 30th  2018.

 

 

IQUA Symposium 2017: Drainage in Glacial Landscapes

The IQUA Symposium 2017 “Drainage in Glacial Landscapes” which will be held on Friday the 24th of November

in the GSI lecture theatre. Registration from 9:30am.
To whet your appetite, here are some teasers for tomorrow’s talks – it certainly looks like it will be a fascinating day!

John Lowe explores the difficulty of timing the Younger Dryas readvance in the Scottish Highlands.

Susan Hegarty revisits the late glacial meltwater channels in county Kilkenny.

Robbie Meehan will try to untangle the Rathcroghan Uplands landscape from county Roscommon. Non-glacial drainage in glacially moulded landscape.

Jasper Knight reviews the eskers from North-Central Ireland.

Ro Charlton reveals the glacial influence of Holocene drainage in the Shannon basin.

Mike Philcox reviews the story of the Glacial Lake at Blessington.

Anthony Beese describes a late-glacial boulder deposit in Tipperary.

Robert Devoy and Pete Coxon join forces to unpeel the interglacial sequences of the lower Lee estuary.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Back flyer Iqua symposium 2017
Front flyer Iqua symposium 2017